Altered Constants

Copyright

Copyright is a tricky subject. While I fully support the original purpose of copyright law—to incentivize authors and inventors to create more to share—I am disappointed in what it has become.

by C.G.P. Grey

And while I fully respect everyone's individual right to choose how best to share their works and make a living, I must abstain from "business as usual". If someone sees value in what I share and thinks they can improve upon (or make money from) my work, they have my blessing. I hope that my contribution to the inherently collaborative process of human expression and knowledge helps inspire others to join in.

However, in order to promote my ideals, I retain all rights provided by US and international copyright law. Counter-intuitive as it might seem, this is a requirement for "copyleft" licensing.

Licensing

All content on this site (alteredconstants.com) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License unless otherwise noted or attributed. Basically*, you can use my works in whatever way you see fit (including commercial endeavors), so long as you adhere to the following requirements:

  1. Include a credit or byline to either me (Zeff Svoboda) or my site ("alteredconstants.com" or "Altered Constants" if a link is otherwise provided) in a clear and obvious (though not necessarily obtrusive) way.
  2. Share my work or any changes made to it under the same or similar license.
  3. (Optional) A link back to the original source on this site or the main page would be appreciated.
  4. (Optional) Let me know what you're doing (or planning to do) with it—I'd love to hear about your project.

* While I am an amateur law geek, I don't claim to know the intricate details of licensing. Thus, in the event of any conflict between what I say and what the CC-BY-SA 3.0 legal code says, the legal code is to be considered binding. See the "human-readable" version if you're a mere mortal.

† Yes, optional requirements. I can't explicitly enforce these through the license and I'm not sure I would in any case, but they are in keeping with my ideals of collaborative creation.